Bonus Screening: Chicago Loves Cincinnati (presented by Christy LeMaster)

  • 21c Museum Hotels 609 Walnut St Cincinnati, OH, 45202 United States

Christy LeMaster presents Chicago Loves Cincinnati

Event is free and open to the public.

21c Cincinnati will host a presentation by Chicago-based artist Christy LeMaster, in conjunction with the inaugural season of Cincinnati’s new Mini Microcinema, a project created by Jacqueline Wood with the support of a People’s Liberty grant. Chicago Loves Cincinnati is part of LeMaster’s Chicago Loves… series designed to help build connections between small regional art spaces and the Windy City. 

At 21c Cincinnati, LeMaster will discuss her own microcinema in Chicago, The Nightingale, followed by a screening of films by Chicago filmmakers. The event also acts as an open call for Cincinnati-based filmmakers who are encouraged to submit work on DVD’s, flash drives, etc. to The Nightingale for review. LeMaster’s multi-platform project explores alternative modes of art film distribution, IRL (“in real life”) social connectivity, and is part of splitbeam.org, a website designed to create a national directory of microcinemas.
 

Program Details:

THANKS FOR SUPPORTING CHICAGO CINEMA 2009 by The Nightingale

(2009, 16mm to DV, 2 min)

Every November, The Nightingale throws a giant potluck and shoots a trailer for the coming year. 

 

SING AS WE GO by Marianna Milhorat

(2011, 16mm to DV, 6 min)

The city’s wavering light is its pulse and its extinguishment.

 

A SYMPTOM by Ben Balcom

(2014, 16mm to DV, 6 min)

A mirrored discourse. The object we see is that which craves articulation, but is never said quite right. We are looking at speech from both sides of the mirror, listening to that wretch who elaborates upon the grid of desire.

 

A MILLION MILES AWAY by Jennifer Reeder

(2014, HD, 28 min)

Melancholy as a survival strategy in the American Mid-West: An adult woman (the conductor) on the edge of failing and a pack of teenage girls (the choir) simultaneously experience a supernatural version of coming-of-age. The transformation is equal parts tense and tender. It unravels patiently to the infectious beat of an 80s era heavy metal anthem rearranged as a lamentation.

 

TRANSFORMERS: THE PRE-MAKE (a desktop documentary) by Kevin B. Lee

(2014, screen capture to DV, 25 min)

Transformers: Age of Extinction, the fourth installment of the Transformers movie franchise directed by Michael Bay, was released June 27 2014. But long before on YouTube one could access an immense trove of production footage recorded by amateurs in locations where the film was shot, such as Utah, Texas, Detroit, Chicago, Hong Kong and mainland China. Transformers: the Premake turns 355 YouTube videos into a critical investigation of the global big budget film industry, amateur video making, and the political economy of images. The Premake utilizes a “desktop documentary” technique that acknowledges the internet's role not only as a boundless repository of information but as a primary experience of reality. It creatively depicts the process in which we explore a deep web of images and data to reach moments of discovery and decisive action. In a blockbuster cinema culture rife with insipid remakes of franchise properties, The Premake presents a critical counter-image in which personalized digital media asks what Hollywood is really doing in the world.